Connect with us

Travel

Explore Navajo Nation Parks

The Navajo Nation Reservation is an extraordinary place as it is over 25,000 miles and covers over four states: New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. Come experience the breathtaking views of what the Navajo Nation Parks have to offer.

Tseyi Overlook - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
Tseyi Overlook – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

The Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation oversee all Navajo Tribal Parks in the Navajo Nation Reservation. Private lands make up the Navajo Nation which means all non-Navajo travelers and visitors must comply with and abide by the regulations, policies, and laws that are communicated by the Navajo Nation Government. Their intent is to continue the caretaking of Mother Earth, which Navajos respect at all times. For further information on rules and regulations please click here

Navajo Nation, Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
Monument Valley – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

“Protect, preserve and manage tribal parks, monuments and recreation areas for the perpetual enjoyment and benefit of the Navajo Nation” 

-The mission of the Navajo Parks & Recreation Department
Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

The Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park

The Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is one of the most majestic and highly photographed. The park is made up of sandstone masterpieces ranging from a variety of heights, 400 to 1,000 feet tall. Miles of mesas, buttes, windblown sand, shrubs, and trees surround these beautiful pinnacles of rock. All of these components make up the magnificent colors of the valley and are a one-of-a-kind sight to witness. You can view the world-famous panorama Merrick Butte and Mitten Butte from the visitor center. Sit back, relax, and take a guided tour in a jeep through all of the mystical formations for a narrated cruise by the Navajo tour operations. The visitor center offers Haskenneini Restaurant serving American cuisines, Hakenni, and a film, snack, and souvenir shop.

Monument Valley - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
Monument Valley – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park

The next stop is Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park where long before, herds of antelope roamed freely in Antelope Canyon. That is where the canyon got its English name from. There are plenty of unique places including, the Rainbow Bridge Trail, Upper, and Lower Part East Waterholes, and Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon. Cattle would graze in the wintertime in the canyon and LeChee area. To many older Navajos, entering Antelope Canyon was a very surreal experience from the landscape. To be in the right state of mind, to prepare for protection and respect, Navajos would take a moment and pause before making an entrance. This would allow them to be in harmony with something greater than themselves, and allow them to leave with an uplifted feeling of what Mother Nature has to offer. It was, and is, a sublime experience for the Navajos. You have the opportunity to take a guided tour and immerse yourself in the rich history of learning about the Antelope Canyon tours within Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park. 

Sheep Canyon at Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
Sheep Canyon at Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

Canyon de Chelly- Tseyi Heritage Center

Tseyi’ Dine’ Heritage Area – Cottonwood Campground (TDHA) is located near the entrance of Canyon de Chelly National Monument in Chinle, Arizona. Come take in the breathtaking views and enjoy the rich history of the ancient ones who put down their roots and flourished within these canyons by booking a guided tour. You’ll book with one of the local tour operators who will take you in my vehicle, foot, or by horse. You also have the option of taking a self-guided tour of the North and South Rim Drives and view the canyon from the overlooks. Park your RV or come pitch a tent to enjoy a quiet night underneath the stars with a barbeque grill and a picnic table available at each campsite. TDHA is managed by Navajo Parks and Recreation through a cooperative management agreement with the National Park Service. www.nps.gov

Cottonwood Campground - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
Cottonwood Campground – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

Fees

Camping: $14.00 per night (up to 7 people) first come, first-served basis

  • No RV Hookups

Group Camping: $50.00 per night (14-30 people) by reservation only

Day Use/Water/Dump Station: $5.00

Backcountry Permits: (issued 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily)

  • NPS Backcountry Permit: $2.00 per person, per tour (with authorized guide; only for Canyon de Chelly National Monument)
  • Navajo Nation Backcountry Permit: $12.00 per person/24-hour period.

**Fees are subject to change.

White House Ruin Trail at Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
White House Ruin Trail at Canyon de Chelly National Monument – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
  • Hours of Operation: 

The campground is open year-round (minimum sites available October-March)

  • Restroom Facilities
  • No Showers

Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7 days a week.

Closed:

  • Thanksgiving Day (November 25)
  • Navajo Nation Family Day (November 26)
  • Christmas Day (December 25)
  • New Year’s Day (January 1)

Location:

Chinle, Arizona 86503

  • 1/2 mile South of  Canyon de Chelly National Monument Welcome Center
  • GPS Coordinates: 39˚08’55”N 109˚32’22”W

Questions:

928-674-2106 or email: cdc@navajonationparks.org

White House Ruin Trail at Canyon de Chelly National Monument - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook
White House Ruin Trail at Canyon de Chelly National Monument – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation & Recreation Facebook

Four Corners Monument Navajo Tribal Park

The only place where four states meet, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah is where the Four Corners Monument Navajo Tribal Park is located. You can purchase native artwork directly from the artisan at a new vendor market. There are no accommodations and services are limited as the monument is located in a pretty rural area. Please be prepared as you travel to this location as there is no electricity or water at this particular location. The nearest gas station/market is located 30 miles away from the monument. 

Four Corners Monument Navajo Tribal Park - Photo Credit: Navajo Nation Parks Website
Four Corners Monument Navajo Tribal Park – Photo Credit: Navajo Nation Parks Website

Entry Fee 

  • $5.00 per person, per day. Purchase can be made upon arrival.
  • Please be prepared for long wait times, and inclement weather.
  • We do not accept National Park Passes.
  • Credit Card Only!

Four Corners Monument Closed

  • We are Closed during all major Holidays in accordance with the Navajo Nation.
  • Thanksgiving Day (November 22)
  • NN Family Day (November 23)
  • Christmas Day (December 25)
  • New Years Day (January 1)

Four Corners Monument Hours of Operation

  • Monday thru Sunday: 8:00 am – 4:45 pm October 1 to March 31 
  • Monday thru Sunday: 8:00 am –  5:45 pm April 1 to April 30 
  • Monday thru Sunday: 8:00 am – 5:45 pm May 1 to May 23 (Thursday before Memorial Day) 
  • Monday thru Sunday: 8:00 am –  5:45 pm May 24 to August 15
Four Corners Monument, Photo Credit: Navajo Nation Parks & Reservation Facebook
Four Corners Monument, Photo Credit: Navajo Nation Parks & Reservation Facebook

Little Colorado River Gorge

Little Colorado River (LCR) is a very scenic view and it’s the entrance to the historic Grand Canyon which is incredible. There are rigged rocks and rugged terrain is what the area has to offer for the avid hiker. Little Colorado River (LCR) is a very scenic view and it’s the entrance to the historic Grand Canyon which is incredible. There are rigged rocks and rugged terrain is what the area has to offer for the avid hiker. Let someone know where you will be hiking, sign out upon return, and please attain a Backcountry Permit before hiking. For more information, you can visit the Navajo Park and Recreation Visitor Center located at the entrance into the canyon. Hwy 89 and 64. It’s located about 10 miles from the Navajo Parks and Recreation Visitor Center.

Little Colorado River Gorge, Photo Credit: Navajo Nation Parks & Reservation Facebook
Little Colorado River Gorge, Photo Credit: Navajo Nation Parks & Reservation Facebook

Entry Fee

  • Park Entry Fee to the Overlook: $5.00 per person up to overlook only. We do not accept National Park Passes as we are a Tribal Park and subject to Navajo Nation Laws.
  • Backcountry Permits are issued upon request to tribal park areas you are going to hike. $12.00 per person. Additional Fees apply.
  • The Little Colorado River Gorge Entry Fee is purchased upon arrival.  Wear your Mask!  Masks are required in all Navajo Tribal Park areas per Navajo Nation mandate. 

Hours of Operation

  • Monday- Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
  • All Tribal Parks are CLOSED:  Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 25), NN Family Day (Nov. 26), Christmas Day (Dec. 25), and New Year’s Day (Jan. 1).
  • *Navajo Nation honors Daylight Savings Time, DSTo Parks and Recreation Visitor Center.

Howdy, I'm Megan deFabry, I grew up in Reno, Nevada & I now live in Austin, Texas. I'm very passionate about digital marketing and journalism, especially within the western industry. I have a love for rodeos, country music, and maintaining the country way of life!

More in Travel